Melissa D. Stockbridge, Ph.D.

My central research interest is to better understand how individual differences influence one's ability to engage in complex, real-world communication, particularly following brain injury. My previous and current work has highlighted the influences of personality, gender, and pre-morbid cognitive and linguistic skills. I am very interested in the relationship between stress reactivity, support, and social performance and recovery in people with brain injury and other disorders of language.

I am currently a post-doctoral fellow exploring facets of this research at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine (P.I., Argye Hillis).

Previously, I have had experience exploring language and cognition children and adults following concussion, utilizing functional neuroimaging and behavioral phenotyping techniques to examine underlying bases of anxious temperament, writing and advising medication safety policy for the Food and Drug Administration, and studying conservation phylogenomics of South American monotremes.

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Curriculum Vitæ

Download Here (Updated May 2020).

Research

2018 - present
Stroke Cognitive Outcomes and REcovery Lab
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Investigator: Argye Hillis

2018 - 2019
Computational Linguistics and Information Processing Lab
Institute for Advanced Computer Studies, Investigator: Philip Resnik

2013 - 2018
Language Development & Perception Laboratories
University of Maryland, Advisor: Rochelle Newman
Affective and Translational Neuroscience Laboratory
University of Maryland, Advisor: Alexander Shackman

Education

Ph. D., Hearing and Speech Sciences, 2018
M.A., Speech-Language Pathology, 2018
University of Maryland, College Park, MD

M.Sc., Cognitive Neuroscience, 2010 (awarded with distinction)
University College London, London, UK

B.A., Applied Linguistics, 2008 (magna cum laude)
University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD

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Research

My current research examines how individual differences shape the kinds of changes to complex, real world communication that people experience after a brain injury. I am currently involved in projects investigating language production in individuals recovering from a stroke, and those with primary progressive aphasia.

My prior work has examined the interaction of individual differences and communication in those with a mild brain injury. This focus has developed into two interrelated lines of research: examining language in children and young adults with mild brain injury and examining neurobiological underpinnings of individual differences in personality and temperament

Stroke Cognitive Outcomes and REcovery Lab

Aphasia secondary to cerebrovascular accident or dementia can be both frustrating and debilitating for patients. Successful production of complex language relies heavily on the integration of cognitive and linguistic skills. My work examines complex language production over time during recovery from stroke in patients receiving targeted language treatments. In addition, we are developing new ways of examining social behavior among patients, their families, and communities in order to better understand how the broader social context can influence recovery of language after stroke.

Language Development and Perception Laboratories

I completed my doctoral research under Rochelle Newman. Together, we are continuing to develop screening and comprehensive language assessment tools for young children with a suspected concussion in association with the Language Science Center and Universidad de los Andes, Chile. Our work exploring the influence of gender on language across the lifespan, both examining picture naming and open-ended expressive language content in peri-menopausal women and examining the language changes that occur when females experience a concussion, also is ongoing.

Affective and Translational Neuroscience laboratory

As part of a multifasceted project to better understand the challenges associated with social anxiety disorder in children and adolescents, I collaborated as a visiting researcher with Alex Shackman during my doctoral studies. This afforded me the opportunity to engage in behavioral and functional neuroimaging research on how school-aged children respond to risk, reward, and punishment associated with activites in their daily lives.

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Teaching Portfolio

I approach teaching from the perspective that the main objective is for students to become comfortable with foundational concepts while both confident and excited in seeking to learn more. It seems the best retention of a given topic occurs when students are given the opportunity to actively manipulate the information they are learning, to follow their curiousities within a given topic, and to work collaboratively when approaching content that may seem, at first, intimidating.

At University of Maryland, I have taught three classes. Two were required courses for the undergraduate degree in Hearing and Speech Sciences typically completed by students in their final year, and one was an evening course for post-baccalaureat students looking to enter a graduate degree program in speech pathology after completing a bachelor's degree in a different discipline. Click on the course title below to learn more.

HESP 403 Introduction to Phonetic Science
HESP 422 Neurological Bases of Human Communication
HESP 313 Neurobiology for Speech and Hearing

Introduction to Phonetic Science

The primary goal of the course is to provide students with a survey of information about phonetics and facilitate their ability to use this knowledge in an applied setting. This includes knowledge of the nature of language and the physical means by which we produce speech, as well as the kinds of changes involved in normal and disordered speech production.

ASHA Standards
Standard III-B: The applicant must demonstrate knowledge of basic human communication and swallowing processes, including their biological, neurological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural bases.
Standard III-C: The applicant must demonstrate knowledge of the nature of speech, language, hearing, and communication disorders and differences and swallowing disorders, including the etiologies, characteristics, anatomical/physiological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural correlates.

Course Schedule
Unit 1. Sound and the Speech Mechanism
Unit 2. The International Phonetic Alphabet and broad transcription
Unit 3. Connected speech and narrow transcription
Unit 4. Applied uses for transcription, including clinical transcription
Course Syllabus
Course Materials available upon request

Neurological Bases of Human Communication

This course covers basic structure and function of the brain as it pertains to substrates of speech, language, and hearing.
This course is designed as a flipped class. Students watch recorded video lectures in addition to completing readings prior to class. In class time is predominantly spent working forward from readings and applying the information learned in a variety of activities that bring students in contact with both clinical and research applications.

ASHA Standards
Standard III-C: The applicant must demonstrate knowledge of the nature of speech, language, hearing, and communication disorders and differences and swallowing disorders, including the etiologies, characteristics, anatomical/physiological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural correlates.
Standard III-D: The applicant must specifying etiologies and characteristics of neurologically-base-acquired language, speech, reading, writing, and cognitive disorders by demonstrating the understanding of neurological basis of cognitive aspects of communication, including memory, learning, sequencing, problem-solving, and executive functioning and specifying knowledge of hearing, including the impact on speech and language.

Couse Schedule
Unit 1. Cellular & molecular bases of cognitive development
Unit 2. Building from sensory to integrative systems in the CNS
Unit 3. Sensation and movement in the PNS
Unit 4. Higher-order cognitive processes
Course Syllabus
Course Materials available upon request

Neurobiology for Speech and Hearing

This course covers basic structure and function of the brain as it pertains to substrates of speech, language, and hearing. Although this class covered content similar to HESP 422, this was designed to be a two-credit evening class in the non-degree, post-baccalaureate program designed to cover pre-requisite coursework needed to apply to most hearing and speech sciene graduate programs.

ASHA Standards
Standard III-C: The applicant must demonstrate knowledge of the nature of speech, language, hearing, and communication disorders and differences and swallowing disorders, including the etiologies, characteristics, anatomical/physiological, acoustic, psychological, developmental, and linguistic and cultural correlates.
Standard III-D: The applicant must specifying etiologies and characteristics of neurologically-base-acquired language, speech, reading, writing, and cognitive disorders by demonstrating the understanding of neurological basis of cognitive aspects of communication, including memory, learning, sequencing, problem-solving, and executive functioning and specifying knowledge of hearing, including the impact on speech and language.

Couse Schedule
Unit 1. Cellular & molecular bases of cognitive development
Unit 2. Building from sensory to integrative systems in the CNS
Unit 3. Sensation and movement in the PNS
Unit 4. Higher-order cognitive processes
Course Syllabus
Course Materials available upon request

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Introduction to Phonetic Science

Blh balh blah

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Neurological Bases of Human Communication

Blh balh blah neuro

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Clinical Portfolio

I am in the process of becoming a fully-licensed speech-language pathologist. I have worked with many diverse individuals, but my passion lies in cognitive-communcation and language treatment in a healthcare setting. I believe that the most successful sessions are those that are both practical and playful for patients of any age. My responsibility is to design sessions that are both fun and efficiently productive in addressing goals and to continually monitor client progress in order to reach those goals.
I have completed my inplacement experience and outplacement training, and am pursuing my clinical fellowship at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in spring of 2019. While I have learned a variety of tools and assessments in my additional training and coursework, I am currently not yet a licensed speech-language pathologist.

Inplacement Experience

In 2013-2014, at the University of Maryland Hearing and Speech Clinic, I worked with 9 clients through treatment and was the primary clinician for 3 diagnostic sessions, resulting in a total of 208 hours of diagnosis and treatment experience.
Specific profiles included: childhood apraxia of speech, articulation disorders in pre-school and school-aged children, autism, selective mutism, Parkinson's disease, aphasia/adult-onset apraxia, social aspects of language, and fluency disorders

Outplacement Experience

In 2015-2016, I completed 2 clinical internships in health-care settings: Adventist Rehabilitation Hospital in Rockville, MD, and Kennedy Krieger Institute Neurobehavioral Inpatient Unit and Outpatient Clinic in Baltimore, MD. These experiences provided me with a wealth of additional experience in degenerative and acquired changes affecting language, cognitive-linguistic skills, articulation, voice, and swallowing.

Assessments and Measures

In addition to training in critical review and careful use of assessments and measures generally, specific tools I have used include:
Speech and language sample analysis with CLAN
Western Aphasia Battery
Ross Information Processing Assessment
Cognitive-Linguistic Quick Test
Assessment of Language-Related Functional Activities
Scales of Cognitive Ability for Traumatic Brain Injury
Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (and British Picture Vocabulary Scale)
Fluharty Preschool Speech and Language Screening Test
Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals
Goldman-Fristoe Test of Articulation
Overall Assessment of the Speaker's Experience of Stuttering
Communication Attitude Test
Stuttering Severity Instrument
ADOS-2

Additional Training

HIPAA compliance
Red Cross CPR certified
Applying the principles of motor learning to group therapy for adults with apraxia of speech (MSHA, April 2014)
CITI Good Clinical Practice Course (April 2014)
Evaluation & treatment of cognitive/communication deficits in combat-related TBI & PTSD (MSHA, January 2014)
LSVT LOUD Graduate Student Training and Certification Workshop (Spring 2015)
Introduction to PROMPT Technique (March 2015)
ADOS-2 Clinical Training (December 2015)

Clinical Coursework

Full transcript available upon request.

HESP 610 Aphasia
HESP 612 Fluency Disorders
HESP 616 Language Disorders in Children
HESP 620 Phonological and Articulatory Disorders
HESP 624 Voice Disorders
HESP 625 Dysphagia
HESP 635 Aural Rehabilitation/Habilitation
HESP 639 Tracheostomy, Ventilator Dependency, and Head & Neck Cancer
HESP 639B Traumatic Brain Injury
HESP 702 Diagnostic Procedures in Speech-Language Pathology

Sample Work

Diagnostic Report
Individualized Treatment Plan
Semester Progress Report

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